Cost of Doing Business in the Philippines

Last Updated – Apr 22, 2024 @ 8:28 pm

Quick Take

How much is the average total cost to do business in the Philippines:

For small to medium-sized businesses: The average total cost for a small to medium-sized business in the Philippines, including one-time startup costs and recurring costs, can range from approximately PHP 50,000 to PHP 5,000,000 or more per year.

For larger businesses: Larger businesses with more extensive operations, higher employee counts, and specialized needs may face average total costs ranging from PHP 5,000,000 to PHP 50,000,000 or more per year.

Please keep in mind that these figures are rough estimates and can vary significantly based on the specific nature of the business, industry, location, and various other factors.

It’s crucial to conduct a detailed business plan and budgeting process to arrive at a more accurate estimation of the total costs for your particular business venture in the Philippines.

Starting a business in the Philippines might seem like a great idea, whether it’s a small store in your neighborhood or a big multinational company.

After all, many locals and foreigners dream of making their entrepreneurial dreams come to life here.

But there’s a catch.

Thinking about building a business is one thing, but actually starting it is another. It goes without saying that the costs and rules involved in getting a business going can be pretty overwhelming.

Related Guide: 100+ Business Ideas in the Philippines

This article will break down all the money stuff you need to know and anticipate when starting a business in the Philippines for those who are just getting their business started or planning their next big venture.

How the Philippines Compare with other ASEAN Countries

As a future business owner, it’s essential to assess the financial landscape when considering launching a business in the Philippines compared to other ASEAN countries.

Singapore

Establishing a business in Singapore is associated with higher initial capital requirements. However, it offers a thriving business environment and a huge income potential despite its high competition.

Malaysia

Malaysia presents a moderately priced option for starting a business. Its strength lies in the balance between affordability and business prospects it offers.

Thailand

Thailand provides a cost-efficient entry point for entrepreneurs. With relatively lower startup expenses, it’s a great place if you’re looking for lower initial expenses but with good potential for growth.

Vietnam

In recent years, Vietnam has been gaining popularity among startups due to its low-cost environment. It’s known for its affordable labor and living costs.

Indonesia

Indonesia offers diverse business opportunities. However, startup costs can fluctuate significantly depending on the location.

Going back to the Philippines, it falls somewhere in between. It’s not the most expensive, but it’s not the cheapest either.

Just like in other countries, the costs can vary based on your business type and location within the country. This is something that aspiring business owners need to consider carefully before taking the plunge.


Common Costs of Doing Business in the Philippines

We’ve rounded up some of the most common costs you’ll need to consider when starting a business in the Philippines.

Note: These fees constantly change, so always check with the relevant authorities.

1. Registration and Licensing Costs

Business registration fees:

1. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) Fees

These fees are determined by the amount of money your business is officially allowed to use (authorized capital).

For instance, if your business is authorized to use PHP 1 million, you’d pay PHP 1,000 for articles of incorporation, PHP 1,000 for issuance, PHP 510 for bylaws, PHP 470 for stock and transfer book registration, and PHP 75 for membership book registration to the SEC.

2. Bureau of Internal Revenue (BIR) Fees

BIR fees depend on your business type and how much capital you’ve actually invested (paid-up capital).

If you have a general corporation with PHP 1 million in paid-up capital, you’d pay PHP 2,000 for taxpayer registration, PHP 2,000 for permission to print accounting books, as well as PHP4,000 for annual registration to the BIR.

·3. Local Government Unit (LGU) Fees

These fees change depending on where your business is located. In Metro Manila, for instance, you’d pay PHP 1,000 for a business permit and PHP 500 for the mayor’s permit to your local government.

Besides the government fees, you might need to pay for professional help from lawyers or business service providers. These professionals usually charge around PHP 10,000 to PHP 20,000.

4. DTI Registration

Sole proprietorships should register with the Department of Trade and Industry (DTI) for a Certificate of Business Name Registration. Fees may vary according to the scope of your business:

BarangayPHP 200
City or municipalityPHP 500
RegionalPHP 1,000
National:PHP 2,000

The DTI registration certificate is valid for up to five years starting from the date of registration.

Licenses and permits required for specific industries

There is also the matter of industry-specific licenses and permits that you’ll need to secure before you can start operations.

These can add up to a significant expense, depending on the type of business you’re planning to start.

1. Food and Beverage

  • Food Establishment Permit: Restaurants, cafes, and food stalls must obtain this permit from the local health office. The cost can range from PHP 1,000 to PHP 5,000, depending on the size and type of the food establishment.
  • Sanitary Permit: This ensures compliance with health and sanitation standards. Fees for a sanitary permit can vary by location and the type of business but usually start at PHP 90. Prepare to pay a garbage fee of around PHP 1,200. 
  • Public Liability Insurance: This is crucial not only for restaurants, but also for malls and cinemas. It helps protect against potential public liability claims.
  • National Grains Authority License: This is needed for dealerships dealing with rice, corn, and wheat to ensure compliance with regulatory standards.

2. Manufacturing and Industrial Businesses

  • Environmental Compliance Certificate (ECC): This is required for businesses with potential environmental impact. The cost for an ECC can vary significantly based on the environmental impact of the project.
  • Special Permits: Some industries may require special permits, such as those from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for pharmaceutical manufacturing.

3. Construction and Real Estate:

  • Building and Construction Permits: Fees for construction permits are usually calculated based on the project’s valuation. This can be around PHP 15,000 TO PHP 200,000.
  • Real Estate Broker’s License (from DTI): A must-have for real estate brokerage firms to facilitate property transactions legally.

4. Transportation

  • LTO Franchising and Regulatory Board Permit: This is required for businesses providing transportation services to adhere to transportation regulations and standards.

5. Healthcare and Medical Services

  • Department of Health (DOH) Accreditation: Hospitals, clinics, and healthcare providers need DOH accreditation. Find the costs here.

6. Education and Training

  • DepEd Permit to operate: Educational institutions need a permit from the Department of Education or DepEd. It may range from PHP 2,000 to PHP 20,000 or more.
  • CHED Accreditation: Accreditation certificates from the Commission on Higher Education (CHED) for higher education institutions may involve fees ranging from PHP 10,000 to PHP 50,000 or more, depending on the type and scope of accreditation.

7. IT and BPO Services

  • Philippine Economic Zone Authority (PEZA) Registration: The cost of PEZA registration for businesses operating within economic zones is PHP 6,000.

8. Tourism and Hospitality

  • Department of Tourism (DOT) Accreditation: Tourism-related businesses like hotels, travel agencies, and tour operators need DOT accreditation. Find the fees here

9. Mining and Natural Resources

  • Mining Permit: The cost of a mining permit for mining and exploration activities depends on various factors, including the size and location of the mining operation, the type of minerals being extracted, and environmental considerations. Mining permit fees can range from thousands to millions of pesos. For example, small-scale coal mining permits start at PHP 1,000 per hectare.
  • Environmental Compliance Certificate (ECC): This is needed for projects with potential environmental impact. The ECC application fee costs PHP 5,070 while the amendment application costs PHP 2,030.
  • Energy Regulatory Board (ERB): This permit is crucial for LPG dealerships to ensure compliance with safety and regulatory guidelines in the distribution of liquefied petroleum gas.

Renewal fees and periodic compliance costs

These are ongoing expenses that businesses in the Philippines must budget for to maintain their legal status and operate within the bounds of local regulations.

The costs vary depending on the type of business and the nature of the licenses.

1. Business Permit Renewal

Every year, businesses are required to renew their local business permits. The renewal cost is calculated based on various factors, including the type of business, its location, and its gross sales or revenue.

Renewal fees can range from a few thousand pesos to several tens of thousands of pesos or more.

2. Taxes

Businesses are subject to various taxes in the Philippines, including income tax, value-added tax (VAT), and local taxes.

These taxes are typically paid on a regular basis, such as monthly, quarterly, or annually, depending on the tax type and the business’s income.

Bureau of Internal Revenue (BIR) Compliance

Businesses need to comply with BIR reporting requirements. This includes submitting financial statements, withholding taxes, and other documents.

Failing to meet these obligations can result in penalties and fines.

Department of Labor and Employment (DOLE) Compliance

Businesses must also comply with labor laws and regulations, which may include periodic labor inspections, safety and health assessments, and providing benefits to employees.

Compliance costs can include salaries, benefits, and expenses related to labor compliance.

Environmental Compliance

Businesses involved in industries with potential environmental impact, such as manufacturing or mining, may need to renew their Environmental Compliance Certificate (ECC) periodically.

Compliance with environmental regulations may also involve regular monitoring and reporting, which can incur additional costs.

Professional Fees

Some businesses, such as healthcare providers, may need to renew professional licenses and pay membership fees to professional organizations regularly.

Renewal of Industry-Specific License

Depending on the industry, there may be specific licenses and permits that require regular renewal. For example, a tour agency business may need to renew its Department of Tourism (DOT) accreditation periodically.

Insurance Premiums

Businesses often need to renew various business insurance policies, such as liability insurance or property insurance, to protect against potential risks and liabilities.

Registration with Regulatory Bodies

Certain industries, like financial services, require ongoing registration and compliance with regulatory bodies such as the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) or the Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas (BSP).


2. Real Estate and Infrastructure Costs

Renting office space: Central Business Districts vs. provincial areas

CBDs are known for their premium office spaces and higher rental rates due to high business activity.

To give you a picture, office rental costs in Makati can range from PHP 800 to PHP 2,500 per square meter per month or more, depending on the building’s quality, location, and the specific amenities offered.

BGC is another upscale CBD in Metro Manila. Office space rental costs in BGC can range from PHP 700 to PHP 2,200 per square meter per month or higher.

On the other hand, provincial areas like Cebu or Davao offer more affordable rental rates and a generally lower cost of living.

Space rental in Cebu City can range from PHP 300 to PHP 1,000 per square meter per month or more. Meanwhile, rental rates in Davao City may vary from PHP 250 to PHP 800 per square meter per month.

Utility costs: electricity, water, and internet

As businesses continue to operate, utility costs should be a key factor in their budgeting.

The cost of electricity varies depending on the location and usage of the business. Water rates also vary. These rates are slightly higher than residential costs.

Internet costs may also vary depending on the provider and the speed of the connection, but on average, businesses may expect to pay around PHP 1,500 to PHP 5,000 per month for reliable internet

Infrastructure development

For businesses that require physical infrastructure, such as manufacturing plants or warehouses, there may be additional costs involved in developing and maintaining that infrastructure.

This covers construction costs, maintenance and repair costs, and insurance premiums to protect against potential damages or liabilities.

Furniture & equipment

To operate effectively, businesses also need to invest in furniture and equipment. This includes office furniture, computers, phones, printers, and other necessary tools depending on the nature of the business.

The cost of these items can vary depending on the brand, quality, and quantity required.

For example, a small business may need to spend around PHP 50,000 to P200,000 on equipment and furniture while larger businesses may need to spend millions of pesos.


3. Labor and Employment Costs

Average wages and salaries by industry

The labor and employment costs of a business in the Philippines can vary depending on the industry and the location. In general, the minimum daily wages in Manila are as follows:

Non-agriculturePHP 610
AgriculturePHP 573
Service and retail establishments employing 15 workers or lessPHP 573

Outside Metro Manila, salaries may be slightly lower. Some of the highest-paying industries in the Philippines include banking and finance, IT and software development, and healthcare.

13th-month pay

In addition to the regular salaries and wages, businesses in the Philippines are required by law to provide their employees with a 13th-month pay to “rank-and-file” employees.

This is an additional payment equivalent to one-twelfth of the employee’s total basic salary earned during the year. Employers are required to pay this by December 24th of each year, and failing to do so can result in penalties and fines.

Mandatory employee benefits and contributions

Employers in the Philippines are also required to provide their employees with mandatory benefits and contributions to Social Security System (SSS), Philhealth, and Pag-IBIG Fund.

These are meant to provide employees with additional benefits, such as medical and housing assistance. These contributions are deducted from their salaries each month.

Training and development costs

To keep up with industry trends and improve their business operations, companies also need to invest in employee training and development.

This can include internal training programs, external seminars, or a mix of both. The cost of these programs can vary depending on the duration and the number of employees involved.

Small businesses may need to spend around PHP 50,000 to PHP 100,000 per year on training and development, while larger businesses may need to spend millions of pesos.

Additionally, companies may need to provide travel, accommodation, and per diem expenses for employees attending external training programs.

9G Visa fees for foreign workers

For businesses that employ foreign workers, there are also additional costs involved in obtaining the necessary visas and permits. The 9G visa is specifically for foreign nationals who will be working in the Philippines.

The costs for obtaining this visa can vary depending on the nationality of the worker and the specific requirements of the visa application.

Employers may need to pay fees for visa processing, medical examinations, and other requirements. The cost for a 9G visa is around $400 (or PHP 22,700+).

Additionally, employers may need to provide relocation and housing assistance for foreign workers, which can also add to the overall cost.


4. Taxation and Duties

Corporate income tax rates

As with any business operation, taxation and duties are also significant considerations for businesses in the Philippines. 

The corporate income tax rate is currently set at 20% to 25%. However, businesses that are registered under the Philippine Economic Zone Authority (PEZA) may be eligible for a reduced tax rate.

Value-added tax (VAT) and other indirect taxes

In addition to the corporate income tax, businesses in the Philippines are also required to pay value-added tax (VAT) and other indirect taxes such as excise taxes and customs duties.

The VAT rate is set at 12%. Meanwhile, excise taxes are imposed on specific products such as cigarettes, alcohol, and petroleum.

Import and export duties

 These are taxes imposed on goods that are imported or exported from the country. The amount of duty varies depending on the type of goods, their origin, and their destination.

For example, the duty on imported electronics may be higher than the duty on imported clothing. Businesses need to factor in these costs when importing or exporting goods to or from the Philippines.


5. Operational Costs

Cost of utilities and services

Operating a business in the Philippines also comes with various operational costs. Utilities such as electricity, water, and gas can add up to a significant expense.

The cost of these utilities can vary depending on the location and the amount of usage.

For example, a small business may need to spend around PHP 5,000 to PHP 10,000 per month on utilities, while larger businesses may need to spend hundreds of thousands of pesos per month.

Travel, transportation, and logistics costs

For businesses that require travel, transportation, and logistics services, there are additional costs to consider. This can include the cost of gas and maintenance for company vehicles, as well as the cost of shipping and handling products and supplies.

The cost of these services can vary depending on the distance and the mode of transportation used.

Shipping products by air may be more expensive than shipping by sea or land. Additionally, companies may need to provide travel allowances for employees who are required to travel for business purposes.

Cost of raw materials and supplies

Another significant consideration for businesses in the Philippines is the cost of raw materials and supplies. This can vary depending on the industry and the type of goods produced.

For instance, a clothing manufacturer may need to source fabric, thread, and other materials, while a food manufacturer may need to source ingredients and packaging materials.

The cost of these materials can fluctuate depending on market conditions and availability. Businesses may need to factor in the cost of these materials when setting prices for their products or services.

Bookkeeping & accounting

Keeping accurate financial records and maintaining proper accounting and bookkeeping practices is crucial for any type of business since it ensures that they comply with tax laws and regulations.

Small businesses with relatively simple financial transactions may be able to find freelance or part-time bookkeepers or accountants who charge on an hourly or monthly basis.

Hourly rates can range from PHP 300 to PHP 1,000 per hour, while monthly rates can vary from PHP 5,000 to PHP 20,000 or more. 

Costs for large corporations can range from PHP 100,000 to several million pesos per year, depending on the scope and complexity of the work.

Some companies may need additional services beyond standard bookkeeping and accounting, such as tax preparation, financial statement audit, compliance with regulatory requirements, and consulting. These services may incur extra costs.

Insurance (for business, employees, and vehicles)

Lastly, businesses in the Philippines also need to consider the cost of insurance. This includes insurance coverage for the business itself, as well as the employees, buildings, and vehicles.

The cost of insurance can vary depending on the type of coverage needed and the size of the business.

For instance, small businesses may be able to obtain basic liability insurance for as little as PHP 10,000 per year, while larger businesses may need to spend hundreds of thousands of pesos per year on more comprehensive coverage.


6. Financing and Banking Costs

Interest rates for business loans

When it comes to financing and banking costs, businesses need to keep in mind the interest rates for business loans. These rates can vary depending on the lender and the type of loan.

Banks may offer secured business loans with interest rates ranging from 6% to 8% per annum (the average bank lending rate is 7.29% as of April 2023), while unsecured loans may have higher interest rates of up to 12% per annum.

Banking fees and charges

These fees can include monthly maintenance fees, transaction fees, and ATM withdrawal fees. The amount of these fees can vary depending on the bank and the type of account.

It is recommended for businesses to compare fees across different banks and account types to find the best option for their needs.

Foreign exchange rates and related costs

If a business in the Philippines deals with foreign currency, they also need to consider foreign exchange rates and related costs.

This can include fees for currency conversion and international wire transfers. The cost of these fees can vary depending on the bank and the amount being transferred.

Additionally, exchange rates can fluctuate. This affects the amount of money that the business ultimately receives or pays.

It’s important for businesses to keep these costs in mind when engaging in international transactions.


7. Cultural and Miscellaneous Costs

Costs associated with adapting to local business culture

The Philippines is known for its unique and diverse culture, and businesses operating in the country may need to consider cultural and miscellaneous costs. 

This includes the cost of adapting to local business customs, such as giving gifts or hosting entertainment for international clients or partners. These costs also vary depending on the industry and the scale of the business operations.

For instance, companies in the hospitality and tourism industry may need to invest more in providing high-quality customer service and catering to the specific needs and preferences of their clientele.

This may involve hiring staff with specialized language or cultural skills, and investing in unique amenities and experiences. 

Prepare to pay a premium since providing a personalized experience can set a business apart from competitors and help establish long-term relationships with customers and partners.

Costs of legal services

This includes fees for consulting with lawyers, drafting and reviewing contracts, and complying with local laws and regulations.

The cost of legal services can vary depending on the complexity of the legal issues involved and the expertise of the lawyer or law firm.

Hourly rates can range from PHP 1,000 to PHP 10,000 or more, while flat fees for specific legal services can range from PHP 20,000 to PHP 100,000 or more.

Professional & consulting services

In addition to legal services, businesses may also need to consider the cost of professional and consulting services. These can include services such as marketing, public relations, human resources, and IT consulting.

Hourly rates for these services can vary depending on the level of expertise and experience required.

For example, a marketing consultant may charge PHP 3,000 to PHP 5,000 per hour, while an IT consultant may charge PHP 1,500 to PHP 2,500 per hour. Flat fees for specific projects or services can range from PHP 50,000 to PHP 500,000 or more.

Costs of marketing, advertising, and branding in the local context

The importance of marketing, advertising, and branding cannot be overstated when it comes to the success of a business.

It’s essential for businesses to establish a strong and recognizable brand identity in order to stand out in a crowded market. This can involve investing in various marketing and advertising strategies tailored to the local context.

For example, businesses should consider the cost of creating promotional materials in multiple languages, as well as hiring local influencers or celebrities to endorse their products or services.

The cost of these services can vary depending on the scale of the campaign and the level of celebrity involved.

Furthermore, branding efforts may need to be adjusted to cater to specific cultural sensitivities and preferences.

For example, social media advertising can range from PHP 5,000 to PHP 50,000 per month, while search engine optimization (SEO) services may cost upwards of PHP 600,000 per year.

Additionally, businesses may need to invest in events and sponsorships to increase brand visibility and establish a presence in the local market. This can include sponsoring local festivals or sporting events or hosting product launch parties and other corporate events.

The cost of these events can vary depending on the size and scale of the event, as well as the level of branding and marketing involved.


8. Incentives and Support for Businesses

Government incentives for foreign investors

The Philippine government offers incentives for foreign investors looking to do business in the country.

Foreign-owned or controlled corporations may be eligible for an income tax holiday, which provides a period of exemption from corporate income tax.

The duration of the ITH depends on the location and the type of business but can range from 4 to 8 years.

After the income tax holiday period expires, qualified investors may enjoy a reduced corporate income tax rate of 5% or 10%, depending on the location and the nature of the business.

Furthermore, qualified investors can import capital equipment and machinery tax-free or at reduced rates for specific industries.

Another incentive is for those who invest in PEZA-accredited economic zones. The various incentives include tax and duty exemptions, simplified customs procedures, and an expedited business registration process.

Special economic zones and their benefits

Businesses in the Philippines may also consider setting up operations in one of the country’s special economic zones.

These zones offer a variety of benefits aimed at attracting foreign investment and promoting economic development.

For example, businesses operating in these zones may enjoy tax holidays, reduced tax rates, and exemptions from certain taxes and duties.

Furthermore, special economic zones often provide a favorable business environment, with streamlined regulations and procedures and access to specialized infrastructure and services.

Support programs for small and medium enterprises (SMEs)

In addition to incentives for foreign investors, the Philippine government also offers support programs for small and medium enterprises (SMEs).

These programs provide financial assistance, technical training, and other resources to help SMEs grow and succeed in the local market.

DTI offers free training and mentoring for SMEs on various topics such as marketing, finance, and operations management.


How Much Does It Cost to Start A Business In The Philippines

Here’s a quick breakdown of the costs associated with starting a business in the Philippines:

One-time startup costs
Registration & LicensingPHP 10,000 to PHP 50,000
Professional FeesPHP 10,000 to PHP 20,000
Recurring costs
Utility costsPHP 20,000 to PHP 200,000
Labor & employment costsPHP 570 to PHP 2,500 per day (per employee)
Taxation and duties20% to 25% (corporate tax); 12% (VAT)
Business services
Legal servicesPHP 1,000 – P10,000 per hour
Marketing servicesP5,000 – P50,000 per month
Bookkeeping & accountingP5,000 – P30,000 per month

One-time startup costs

  • Registration and Licensing Costs: These costs can range from approximately PHP 10,000 to PHP 50,000 or more, depending on the type of business and its location.
  • Professional Fees: Lawyers or business service providers typically charge around PHP 10,000 to PHP 20,000.
  • Industry-Specific Licenses and Permits: Costs vary widely by industry. For example, food and beverage permits may cost PHP 1,000 to PHP 5,000, while construction permits can range from PHP 15,000 to PHP 200,000 or more.

 Recurring costs:

  • Operational Costs: Monthly utility costs for rent, electricity, water, and internet can range from PHP 20,000 to PHP 100,000 or more, depending on the business size and usage.
  • Labor and Employment Costs: Minimum daily wages in Manila vary from PHP 570 to PHP 610. 13th-month pay is an additional expense, and mandatory benefits and contributions vary by salary level.
  • Taxation and Duties: Corporate income tax rates range from 20% to 25%. Value-added tax (VAT) is set at 12%, and other indirect taxes vary.
  • Financing and Banking Costs: Interest rates for business loans can range from 6% to 12% per annum.
  • Cultural and Miscellaneous Costs: These costs can vary widely based on the business’s specific needs. Legal services may range from PHP 1,000 to PHP 10,000 per hour, while marketing and advertising costs can range from PHP 5,000 to PHP 50,000 per month for social media advertising.

Related: Top Business Services in the Philippines

Average total cost:

  • For small to medium-sized businesses: The average total cost for a small to medium-sized business in the Philippines, including one-time startup costs and recurring costs, can range from approximately PHP 50,000 to PHP 5,000,000 or more per year.
  • For larger businesses: Larger businesses with more extensive operations, higher employee counts, and specialized needs may face average total costs ranging from PHP 5,000,000 to PHP 50,000,000 or more per year.

Please keep in mind that these figures are rough estimates and can vary significantly based on the specific nature of the business, industry, location, and various other factors.

It’s crucial to conduct a detailed business plan and budgeting process to arrive at a more accurate estimation of the total costs for your particular business venture in the Philippines.


Benefits of Starting a Business In The Philippines

Here are the benefits of starting a business in the Philippines:

Strategic Location

The Philippines is strategically located in Southeast Asia, making it an ideal location for businesses to access markets in the Asia-Pacific region.

Large Domestic Market

The Philippines has a population of over 100 million people, providing businesses with a large domestic market to tap into.

English-Speaking Workforce

The Philippines has a large population of English-speaking workers, making it easier for businesses to communicate and operate in the country.

Low Labor Costs

The cost of labor in the country is relatively low compared to other countries in the region. This makes it an attractive location for businesses to set up operations.

Government Incentives

The Philippine government provides a wide range of incentives to businesses, including reduced taxes and streamlined regulations, which can help to lower startup and operating costs.

Support for SMEs

Small and medium-sized enterprises in the Philippines can take advantage of a range of government support programs and resources to help them grow and succeed.

Growing Economy

The Philippine economy is growing rapidly, with the government implementing various policies to promote economic development and attract foreign investment.

Related: Top Business Sectors in the Philippines

Cultural and Tourist Attractions

Aside from the business benefits of starting a venture in the Philippines, there are also several cultural and tourist attractions that make the country a great place to live and work.

From pristine beaches and lush tropical forests to vibrant cities and historic landmarks, the Philippines has something for everyone.

Access to Global Supply Chains

With its strategic location and growing economy, the Philippines offers businesses access to global supply chains.

The country has a modern transportation and logistics infrastructure, including ports and airports, that can facilitate the efficient movement of goods and services across the region and around the world.

The country has also established trade agreements with several countries including Japan, China, and the United States, allowing for easier and more cost-effective trade.

About MJ de Castro

MJ de Castro is the lead personal finance columnist at Grit PH.

MJ started her career as a writer for her local government’s City Information Office. Later on, she became a news anchor on PTV Davao del Norte.

Wanting to break free from the shackles of her 9-to-5 career to live by the beach, she pursued remote work. Over the years, she has developed a wide specialization on health, financial literacy, entrepreneurship, branding, and travel.

Now, she juggles writing professionally, her business centering on women’s menstrual health, and surfing.

Education: Ateneo de Davao University (AB Mass Communication)
Focus: Personal Finance, Personal Development, Entrepreneurship, & Marketing

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